Pipeline

New Mechanisms of Action

LX7101

Indication*
Glaucoma

Overview
LX7101 is a topically-delivered small molecule drug candidate in development for the treatment of glaucoma.  The target of LX7101 is LIM domain kinase 2 (LIMK2), a kinase associated with the regulation of intraocular pressure, and is designed to lower intraocular pressure by enhancing fluid outflow through the trabecular meshwork of the eye. Our scientists discovered that mice lacking LIMK2 exhibited lower intraocular pressure compared to normal mice. In preclinical studies, LX7101 significantly reduced intraocular pressure in animal models of ocular hypertension.

Aqueous humor, made by the ciliary body, continuously flows in and out of the eye.  The fluid leaves the eye at the open angle, flowing through the trabecular meshwork.  This mechanism, known as the fluid outflow facility, regulates IOP in the eye.  LX7101 reduces IOP by enhancing the fluid outflow facility of the eye.


Preclinical Data

In preclinical studies, LX7101 significantly reduced intraocular pressure in both mouse and monkey models of ocular hypertension.

Status
LX7101 has been studied in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in approximately 60 patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.  LX7101 was well-tolerated and showed signals of clinical benefit.

About Glaucoma
Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that gradually impair vision and are usually associated with abnormally high intraocular pressure (IOP), fluid pressure within chambers of the eye. All forms of glaucoma damage the optic nerve, and may lead to blindness. While diagnosis and treatment options have improved, many patients still suffer from partial or total vision loss. Risk factors for glaucoma include age, genetic history, diabetes, and nearsightedness.

All forms of glaucoma damage the optic nerve, and may lead to blindness.


Glaucoma Prevalence

According to the Glaucoma Research Foundation, glaucoma is estimated to affect 65 million people worldwide, including more than 4 million Americans. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world, and is the leading cause of blindness in African-Americans.

Related Publications
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* Safety and efficacy have not been evaluated by any regulatory authorities for the indications described.